Discussion:
'Safe house' for family of man who assaulted 6-year-old
(too old to reply)
(=_=)
2015-01-05 23:05:51 UTC
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Raw Message
And the tax payers of Canada are on the hook for still another cost originating
with first nations and their issues. . . . .

This one is particularly hard to take, considering what their son did - AND
the fact that his family pays no taxes to Canada's system, which is now
providing them with a new home.
The very least they could have accomplished was to pay for their own move.

And they want a 'federal enquiry into missing first nations women'? Maybe
start looking within your own communities.

If the first nations groups dare to demand that this case be tried by their own
'restorative justice' system, they should be made to repay every cent that goes
into the incarceration of this man, and any costs for moving his family to a
new home.
________________________________________________________
http://www.matachewanfirstnation.com/restorative-justice

Restorative Justice involves a more holistic approach. The focus is not only
on the offender but on the victim, the families and the community. The
offender and his/her supporters and the victim and their supporters meet in a
Circle to discuss the wrong doing. The offender is given an opportunity to
gain a better understanding of how their inappropriate actions have impacted
others, particularly the victim. The participants then work as a group on how
to resolve the conflict and how to meet the needs of everyone that has been
affected.
____________________________________________________
The Canadian Press Posted: Jan 05, 2015

Family of accused in Paul Band attack forced to move away
Ramona and James Strong move with their other children to undisclosed location

The little girl was found lying in the snow at Paul Band First Nation, beaten
and suffering from hypothermia, just before Christmas. (CBC)


Loading Image...

Ramona and James Strong say in a statement that RCMP have helped move them and
their other eight children to an undisclosed location.

"You just keep your head down and hope you're not a target but our family is
now a target," the Strongs wrote. "And if we return home we won't get a fair
trial that is sure enough."
James Clifford Paul

James Clifford Paul has been charged with attempted murder, aggravated sexual
assault and kidnapping. (Facebook)

The couple's 21-year-old son, James Clifford Paul, faces charges of attempted
murder, aggravated sexual assault and kidnapping.

The girl was found battered and near death outdoors on the Paul First Nation
near Duffield, west of Edmonton, a few days before Christmas. She remains in
hospital in Edmonton.

The Strongs say they are shocked by what happened to the little girl and are
praying for her recovery.

"We haven't stopped praying and know the pain and hurt we are feeling for the
little girl is a pain and hurt we know [Canadians] are feeling."

The couple say their son is charged with a very serious crime and are confident
he will receive a fair trial. They also express thanks to the RCMP and the Paul
Band leadership for helping them relocate.

"It's a terrible thing but it had to be done to protect us and our kids, none
of us who have done anything wrong," they wrote.

James Clifford Paul is scheduled to be in court in Stony Plain on Jan. 7.
________________________________________________________________________________
http://www.ajic.mb.ca/volumel/chapter2.html#8

ABORIGINAL CONCEPTS OF JUSTICE

Aboriginal Culture

When [Aboriginal people] refuse to follow the exhortations of our
rules, we judge them as deficient in rule-obedience or, worse still, rule-less.
In our ignorance, we have failed to admit the possibility that there might be
rules other than ours to which they regularly display allegiance, an allegiance
all the more striking because it is exercised in defiance of our insistent
pressures to the contrary.

Ethic of Non-Interference

One of the most important is the ethic of non-interference. It "promotes
positive interpersonal relationships by discouraging coercion of any kind, be
it physical, verbal or psychological." It stems from a high degree of respect
for every individual’s independence and regards interference or restriction of
a person’s personal freedom as "undesirable behaviour."

The ethic of non-interference is one of the most widely accepted
principles of behaviour among Native people. It even extends to adult
relationships with children and manifests itself as permissiveness. A Native
child may be allowed at the age of six, for example, to make the decision on
whether or not he goes to school even though he is required to do so by law.
The child may be allowed to decide whether or not he will do his homework, have
his assignments done on time, and even visit the dentist. Native parents will
be reluctant to force the child into doing anything he does not choose to do.

This ethic is one of the most difficult for non-Aboriginal people to understand
because it often conflicts with their conceptions of "accepted" practice. In
European-Canadian society, for instance, children are told what to do, when to
do it and what will happen if they do not do it. Advice is offered freely and
regularly, whether it is welcomed or not. Children are expected to conform,
rather than to experiment, and to learn by rote, rather than by innovation.

The importance of the ethic of non-interference helps to explain the use of
stories in Aboriginal societies. If advice is given, it is usually in the form
of a story. It lays out a situation with options. The advice is contained in
the story and the listener is free to understand it as he or she wants to, and
to act or to not act on that advice accordingly.

This rule of behaviour is still strongly evident in Aboriginal communities.
Where it once was necessary to ensure the survival of a group, this ethic
continues to be functional to maintain harmony within the community. It demands
people show respect for other people’s personal privacy. It promotes individual
self-reliance and responsibility with assurances that others will not intercede
or interfere in the individual’s personal affairs. Finally, it encourages
people to make decisions, and accept responsibility for those decisions,
starting at an early age.
Alan Baker
2015-01-05 23:18:41 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by (=_=)
And the tax payers of Canada are on the hook for still another cost
originating with first nations and their issues. . . . .
And your bigotry raises it's ugly head again.
Post by (=_=)
This one is particularly hard to take, considering what their son did -
AND the fact that his family pays no taxes to Canada's system, which
is now providing them with a new home.
The very least they could have accomplished was to pay for their own move.
"Innocent until proven guilty": perhaps you've heard of it?

And even if he is guilty, why does that mean his family should be at risk?

Or is fairness only for white folks such as yourself?

:-)
Post by (=_=)
And they want a 'federal enquiry into missing first nations women'?
Maybe start looking within your own communities.
If the first nations groups dare to demand that this case be tried by
their own 'restorative justice' system, they should be made to repay
every cent that goes into the incarceration of this man, and any costs
for moving his family to a new home.
________________________________________________________
http://www.matachewanfirstnation.com/restorative-justice
Restorative Justice involves a more holistic approach. The focus is
not only on the offender but on the victim, the families and the
community. The offender and his/her supporters and the victim and
their supporters meet in a Circle to discuss the wrong doing. The
offender is given an opportunity to gain a better understanding of how
their inappropriate actions have impacted others, particularly the
victim. The participants then work as a group on how to resolve the
conflict and how to meet the needs of everyone that has been affected.
____________________________________________________
The Canadian Press Posted: Jan 05, 2015
Family of ACCUSED in Paul Band attack forced to move away
^^^^^^^^

12345678
ABCDEFGH
^^^^^^^^
Post by (=_=)
Ramona and James Strong move with their other children to undisclosed location
The little girl was found lying in the snow at Paul Band First
Nation, beaten and suffering from hypothermia, just before Christmas.
(CBC)
http://i.cbc.ca/1.2880902.1419202697!/fileImage/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/16x9_620/paul-band-girl-injured.jpg
Ramona and James Strong say in a statement that RCMP have helped move
them and their other eight children to an undisclosed location.
"You just keep your head down and hope you're not a target but our
family is now a target," the Strongs wrote. "And if we return home we
won't get a fair trial that is sure enough."
James Clifford Paul
James Clifford Paul has been charged with attempted murder, aggravated
sexual assault and kidnapping. (Facebook)
The couple's 21-year-old son, James Clifford Paul, faces charges of
attempted murder, aggravated sexual assault and kidnapping.
The girl was found battered and near death outdoors on the Paul First
Nation near Duffield, west of Edmonton, a few days before Christmas.
She remains in hospital in Edmonton.
The Strongs say they are shocked by what happened to the little girl
and are praying for her recovery.
"We haven't stopped praying and know the pain and hurt we are feeling
for the little girl is a pain and hurt we know [Canadians] are feeling."
The couple say their son is charged with a very serious crime and are
confident he will receive a fair trial. They also express thanks to the
RCMP and the Paul Band leadership for helping them relocate.
"It's a terrible thing but it had to be done to protect us and our
kids, none of us who have done anything wrong," they wrote.
James Clifford Paul is scheduled to be in court in Stony Plain on Jan. 7.
________________________________________________________________________________
http://www.ajic.mb.ca/volumel/chapter2.html#8
ABORIGINAL CONCEPTS OF JUSTICE
Aboriginal Culture
When [Aboriginal people] refuse to follow the exhortations of
our rules, we judge them as deficient in rule-obedience or, worse
still, rule-less. In our ignorance, we have failed to admit the
possibility that there might be rules other than ours to which they
regularly display allegiance, an allegiance all the more striking
because it is exercised in defiance of our insistent pressures to the
contrary.
Ethic of Non-Interference
One of the most important is the ethic of non-interference. It
"promotes positive interpersonal relationships by discouraging coercion
of any kind, be it physical, verbal or psychological." It stems from a
high degree of respect for every individual’s independence and regards
interference or restriction of a person’s personal freedom as
"undesirable behaviour."
The ethic of non-interference is one of the most widely
accepted principles of behaviour among Native people. It even extends
to adult relationships with children and manifests itself as
permissiveness. A Native child may be allowed at the age of six, for
example, to make the decision on whether or not he goes to school even
though he is required to do so by law. The child may be allowed to
decide whether or not he will do his homework, have his assignments
done on time, and even visit the dentist. Native parents will be
reluctant to force the child into doing anything he does not choose to
do.
This ethic is one of the most difficult for non-Aboriginal people to
understand because it often conflicts with their conceptions of
"accepted" practice. In European-Canadian society, for instance,
children are told what to do, when to do it and what will happen if
they do not do it. Advice is offered freely and regularly, whether it
is welcomed or not. Children are expected to conform, rather than to
experiment, and to learn by rote, rather than by innovation.
The importance of the ethic of non-interference helps to explain the
use of stories in Aboriginal societies. If advice is given, it is
usually in the form of a story. It lays out a situation with options.
The advice is contained in the story and the listener is free to
understand it as he or she wants to, and to act or to not act on that
advice accordingly.
This rule of behaviour is still strongly evident in Aboriginal
communities. Where it once was necessary to ensure the survival of a
group, this ethic continues to be functional to maintain harmony within
the community. It demands people show respect for other people’s
personal privacy. It promotes individual self-reliance and
responsibility with assurances that others will not intercede or
interfere in the individual’s personal affairs. Finally, it encourages
people to make decisions, and accept responsibility for those
decisions, starting at an early age.
Mudge
2015-01-05 23:19:35 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by (=_=)
And the tax payers of Canada are on the hook for still another cost
originating with first nations and their issues. . . . .
Which will never end until we get equality foir all Canadians - and
that means ALL !

No special treatment for the lazy sob's that are now called "First Nations"
--
The Canadian Curmudgeon (in Calgary)
Remove noxious CO2 - plant many trees
(=_=)
2015-01-06 00:34:10 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by (=_=)
And the tax payers of Canada are on the hook for still another cost
originating with first nations and their issues. . . . .
Which will never end until we get equality foir all Canadians - and that means
ALL !
No special treatment for the lazy sob's that are now called "First Nations"
Just remember two things:
1. Their numbers are growing faster than any other cultural group in this country.
2. They became "lazy sob's" only because our governments - elected by us - are
willing to keep pacifying them with our tax money.

Where does the change start for their independence off the teat - on their end
or on OUR end?

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