Discussion:
Got stocks in the oil market?
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(ಠ_ಠ)
2014-12-07 01:32:16 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Good for you . . . . you're about to get a taste of what happens when you tie
your boat to a sinking ship. A stinkin', polluting, environment-destroying ship.
_____________________________________________
Boom and Bust in Alberta


An oil boom creates scores of multi-millionaires but then the party ends

In the 1970s, Alberta was hit by a modern-day gold rush. Oil prices soared and
adventurers flooded into the province in a frenzied hunt to strike it rich.

For geologist Jim Gray, these were the glory days in Alberta when the pioneer
spirit was alive and well.

"Lets drill that well. Lets take that land. Lets not talk about this for the
rest of the day. And lets not have a bloody committee. And if we fail, well
fail big. But if we win, were gonna win big."

Gray did win big. He and his partner, John Masters, discovered Elmworth Deep
Basin, a gas field west of Grande Prairie, Alberta, which turned out to be the
second largest in North America.

"It was a great moment of self-satisfaction, especially when you find it where
everyone else said not to go," said Gray, who formed the company Canadian Hunter.

Gray - a devout Mormon from Kirkland Lake, Ontario - quickly joined the wild
pace of Calgarys oil world.

"There are over seven hundred oil and gas companies here," Gray said. "Its
heavy competition. Some people can't keep up with it. We've got a high
incidence of social stress. Divorce, drinking, suicide. But there's a lot of
us who thrive on it."

Imperial Oil lay claim to Alberta's first big oil strike in 1947. But the oil
frenzy more than two decades later would be touched off by an event half way
around the world.
In Alberta, the oil boom was creating more multi-millionaires than anytime
before in Canadian history. Alberta's Bible belt image was replaced by the
notion of oil wealth, with all its attendant perks and vices.

For a while, it seems as if money really did grow on trees. And everyone wanted
a piece of the action.

During the 1970s, the provinces population increased by a third. Four thousand
people a month flood into the province, looking for a share of this modern-day
gold rush.

"We would work seven days a week, sixteen, twenty hours a day," said oil rig
worker Dwayne Mather. "I was young) and full of all kinds of ambition and it
was great, a great time."

The Alberta oil industry boomed, transforming the cities of Calgary and Edmonton

At the height of the boom, Calgary issued more than $1 billion worth of
construction permits annually, more than Chicago or New York. Apartment
vacancy rates approached zero as Ontarians and Maritimers arrived daily in
search of high-paying jobs.

The housing market boomed, oil stocks rose, and an entrepreneurial spirit, once
exclusive to businessmen, was awakened in professors, lawyers, and dentists,
who began speculating in real estate and experimenting with oil ventures.

At Calgary's Petroleum Club, new Canadian millionaires rubbed shoulders with
American oil company presidents. The big players swap tales and make deals.
Jim Gray thrived on the competition:

"Everybody wanted to be in a big building. Everybody wanted to have a
corporate airplane. Young people with two or three or four years experience
were getting together with some other friends and starting their own little oil
and gas company."

But the frenzied greed of the Alberta oil boom would take its toll. By the
early 1980s, too rapid expansion and a world-wide economic recession hit the
industry hard.

As unpredictably as it began, the Alberta oil boom was over.

In 1982, Dome Petroleum, the country's largest oil company, avoided collapse
with a last-minute bailout package with Ottawa and the banks.

Within two years, mirroring trends elsewhere in the country, unemployment in
the province rose from 4 to 10 per cent. For the first time in more than a
decade, Alberta had more people leaving the province than coming in. The
province led the nation in housing foreclosures, bankruptcies and suicides.

The Calgary Heralds classified section bulged with homes for sale, sometimes
including the contents and cars. The city had 2.3 million square metres of
vacant office space, and its real estate speculators and oil investors had
reverted to their former careers as teachers, dentists, and taxi drivers.

In 1986, Alberta received another economic blow when world oil price declined
steeply.

Alberta's economic woes began to turn around in the late 1980s. The provincial
government used enormous royalty revenues generated from oil and gas sales to
diversify into the forestry sector.

By the mid-1990s, Alberta's fortunes were on the rise again, thanks to the
fiscally responsible Ralph Klein government and higher world prices for oil and
natural gas.
_________________________________

And today:

OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail - Thursday, Dec. 04 2014

Saudi oil-price cut prompts Canadian energy stock slide
Alberta energy firms face harsh new reality as oil's slide steepens

Canada's energy sector faces the prospect of a lengthy downturn in oil prices
and broad spending cuts after OPEC said it does not intend to cut production –
a move that sent crude prices and energy shares plunging.

Investors immediately punished Canadian energy companies in reaction to the
Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries' decision Thursday to stand
firm on its production plans, defying industry hopes for a cut. The S&P/TSX
Capped Energy Index sank 7 per cent, hitting its lowest point since April,
2013. The price for Brent oil, the global benchmark, dropped $5.17 (U.S.) a
barrel to close at $72.58, a four-year low. West Texas Intermediate oil, the
North American standard, dropped $4.64 a barrel to $69.05.

Oil prices have been skidding since June, reflecting a global oversupply of
crude resulting from surging U.S. production and slack demand growth.

Now, Canada's energy producers, along with the Alberta government, must
reconsider their financial future. Oil firms must prepare for pinched profits,
and may have to shelve expansion aspirations.

So far, the energy industry has taken few major steps in reaction to plunging
oil prices, showing a reluctance to pull back production and give up revenue.
But analysts say any sustained downturn will force action to face the new reality.

"I think we're probably still in a state of denial. The producing industry, not
just here in Calgary but in North America, is still thinking that these prices
aren't going to be here for long, so no one's wanting to react yet," said Randy
Ollenberger, a Bank of Montreal analyst.

"But I think if we see these prices for a couple of months more – and I think
that's a distinct possibility – then you might start to see people looking at
this more seriously and become a little more concerned about what it means."
Alan Baker
2014-12-07 04:06:10 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by (ಠ_ಠ)
Good for you . . . . you're about to get a taste of what happens when
you tie your boat to a sinking ship. A stinkin', polluting,
environment-destroying ship.
You think the oil and gas industry as a whole is a "sinking ship"?

I'd make a bet with you on that, but your type never make good.
Post by (ಠ_ಠ)
_____________________________________________
Boom and Bust in Alberta
An oil boom creates scores of multi-millionaires but then the party ends
In the 1970s, Alberta was hit by a modern-day gold rush. Oil prices
soared and adventurers flooded into the province in a frenzied hunt to
strike it rich.
For geologist Jim Gray, these were the glory days in Alberta when the
pioneer spirit was alive and well.
"Lets drill that well. Lets take that land. Lets not talk about this
for the rest of the day. And lets not have a bloody committee. And if
we fail, well fail big. But if we win, were gonna win big."
Gray did win big. He and his partner, John Masters, discovered
Elmworth Deep Basin, a gas field west of Grande Prairie, Alberta, which
turned out to be the second largest in North America.
"It was a great moment of self-satisfaction, especially when you find
it where everyone else said not to go," said Gray, who formed the
company Canadian Hunter.
Gray - a devout Mormon from Kirkland Lake, Ontario - quickly joined the
wild pace of Calgarys oil world.
"There are over seven hundred oil and gas companies here," Gray said.
"Its heavy competition. Some people can't keep up with it. We've got
a high incidence of social stress. Divorce, drinking, suicide. But
there's a lot of us who thrive on it."
Imperial Oil lay claim to Alberta's first big oil strike in 1947. But
the oil frenzy more than two decades later would be touched off by an
event half way around the world.
In Alberta, the oil boom was creating more multi-millionaires than
anytime before in Canadian history. Alberta's Bible belt image was
replaced by the notion of oil wealth, with all its attendant perks and
vices.
For a while, it seems as if money really did grow on trees. And
everyone wanted a piece of the action.
During the 1970s, the provinces population increased by a third. Four
thousand people a month flood into the province, looking for a share of
this modern-day gold rush.
"We would work seven days a week, sixteen, twenty hours a day," said
oil rig worker Dwayne Mather. "I was young) and full of all kinds of
ambition and it was great, a great time."
The Alberta oil industry boomed, transforming the cities of Calgary and Edmonton
At the height of the boom, Calgary issued more than $1 billion worth of
construction permits annually, more than Chicago or New York.
Apartment vacancy rates approached zero as Ontarians and Maritimers
arrived daily in search of high-paying jobs.
The housing market boomed, oil stocks rose, and an entrepreneurial
spirit, once exclusive to businessmen, was awakened in professors,
lawyers, and dentists, who began speculating in real estate and
experimenting with oil ventures.
At Calgary's Petroleum Club, new Canadian millionaires rubbed shoulders
with American oil company presidents. The big players swap tales and
"Everybody wanted to be in a big building. Everybody wanted to have a
corporate airplane. Young people with two or three or four years
experience were getting together with some other friends and starting
their own little oil and gas company."
But the frenzied greed of the Alberta oil boom would take its toll. By
the early 1980s, too rapid expansion and a world-wide economic
recession hit the industry hard.
As unpredictably as it began, the Alberta oil boom was over.
In 1982, Dome Petroleum, the country's largest oil company, avoided
collapse with a last-minute bailout package with Ottawa and the banks.
Within two years, mirroring trends elsewhere in the country,
unemployment in the province rose from 4 to 10 per cent. For the first
time in more than a decade, Alberta had more people leaving the
province than coming in. The province led the nation in housing
foreclosures, bankruptcies and suicides.
The Calgary Heralds classified section bulged with homes for sale,
sometimes including the contents and cars. The city had 2.3 million
square metres of vacant office space, and its real estate speculators
and oil investors had reverted to their former careers as teachers,
dentists, and taxi drivers.
In 1986, Alberta received another economic blow when world oil price
declined steeply.
Alberta's economic woes began to turn around in the late 1980s. The
provincial government used enormous royalty revenues generated from oil
and gas sales to diversify into the forestry sector.
By the mid-1990s, Alberta's fortunes were on the rise again, thanks to
the fiscally responsible Ralph Klein government and higher world prices
for oil and natural gas.
_________________________________
OTTAWA — The Globe and Mail - Thursday, Dec. 04 2014
Saudi oil-price cut prompts Canadian energy stock slide
Alberta energy firms face harsh new reality as oil's slide steepens
Canada's energy sector faces the prospect of a lengthy downturn in oil
prices and broad spending cuts after OPEC said it does not intend to
cut production – a move that sent crude prices and energy shares
plunging.
Investors immediately punished Canadian energy companies in reaction to
the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries' decision
Thursday to stand firm on its production plans, defying industry hopes
for a cut. The S&P/TSX Capped Energy Index sank 7 per cent, hitting its
lowest point since April, 2013. The price for Brent oil, the global
benchmark, dropped $5.17 (U.S.) a barrel to close at $72.58, a
four-year low. West Texas Intermediate oil, the North American
standard, dropped $4.64 a barrel to $69.05.
Oil prices have been skidding since June, reflecting a global
oversupply of crude resulting from surging U.S. production and slack
demand growth.
Now, Canada's energy producers, along with the Alberta government, must
reconsider their financial future. Oil firms must prepare for pinched
profits, and may have to shelve expansion aspirations.
So far, the energy industry has taken few major steps in reaction to
plunging oil prices, showing a reluctance to pull back production and
give up revenue. But analysts say any sustained downturn will force
action to face the new reality.
"I think we're probably still in a state of denial. The producing
industry, not just here in Calgary but in North America, is still
thinking that these prices aren't going to be here for long, so no
one's wanting to react yet," said Randy Ollenberger, a Bank of Montreal
analyst.
"But I think if we see these prices for a couple of months more – and I
think that's a distinct possibility – then you might start to see
people looking at this more seriously and become a little more
concerned about what it means."
RightWing
2014-12-13 03:53:05 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Alan Baker
Post by (ಠ_ಠ)
Good for you . . . . you're about to get a taste of what happens when you
tie your boat to a sinking ship. A stinkin', polluting,
environment-destroying ship.
You think the oil and gas industry as a whole is a "sinking ship"?
I'd make a bet with you on that, but your type never make good.
For the better part, when the TSX shows a massive dip like it did last
week, real capitalist jump in an buy! Buy! Buy!

Fuck! Do you really think that the RBC is worth less in reality than
it was a month ago? Crap! It's a bargain! Same with
petrochemicals.

Or you could dump your stocks and take the advice of that dude on the
radio who says "Buy Gold!" "Keep in in your Garage!"

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