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Green energy sector jobs surpass total oil sands employment
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2014-12-04 00:41:22 UTC
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December 2, 2014 - http://www.theglobeandmail.com/


Green energy sector jobs surpass total oil sands employment

Climate think tank says Ottawa is 'really missing in action' when it comes to
support for clean energy


Canada's green energy sector has grown so quickly and has become such an
important part of the economy that it now employs more people than the oil sands.

About $25-billion has been invested in Canada's clean-energy sector in the past
five years, and employment is up 37 per cent, according to a new report from
climate think tank Clean Energy Canada to be released Tuesday. That means the
23,700 people who work in green energy organizations outnumber the 22,340 whose
work relates to the oil sands, the report says.

Worldwide, 6.5 million people are employed in the clean-energy sector.

"Clean energy has moved from being a small niche or boutique industry to really
big business in Canada," said Merran Smith, director of Clean Energy Canada.
The investment it has gleaned since 2009 is roughly the same as has been pumped
into agriculture, fishing and forestry combined, she said. The industry will
continue to show huge growth potential, beyond most other business sectors, she
added.

While investment has boomed, the energy-generating capacity of wind, solar,
run-of-river hydro and biomass plants has expanded by 93 per cent since 2009,
the report says.

Clean Energy Canada says the industry's growth has been accelerated by
supportive policies in a handful of provinces. However, despite its increased
importance to the national economy, clean energy is still not a priority in
Ottawa, it says.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Government backing is crucial for this industry, Ms. Smith said, as it has been
for our other strategic industries. "Every major industrial sector in Canada –
from the aerospace industry to the oil sands – has gotten off the ground with
support from the federal government. But in the clean-energy sector, the
federal government is really missing in action."

Not only does the oil industry still get more substantial subsidies, she said,
it also eats up a good deal of the country's diplomatic relations efforts –
through the lobbying for the
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Keystone XL pipeline, for example.

The report acknowledges that Ottawa has set some groundwork for clean energy,
by supporting clean-energy demonstration and research projects, cutting energy
waste and discouraging the construction of conventional coal-power plants. But
it says the federal government needs to do a lot more. Ottawa should create tax
supports for renewable technologies, pump infrastructure money into new
electrical transmission lines and clean-energy projects, and put a price on
carbon, it says.

As for the provinces, Alberta and Saskatchewan in particular should follow
Ontario, Quebec and British Columbia in getting into the renewable-energy game,
Ms. Smith said. Still, the necessity for this shift is beginning to gain some
traction, she said, noting that Alberta Finance Minister Robin Campbell said
last week that the province has to "get off the oil train."

That's a view shared by Kent Brown, chief executive officer of BluEarth
Renewables Inc., a company that focuses on clean energy from the heart of the
oil patch in Calgary. This new sector is now "a huge piece of the economy,"
Mr. Brown said. "It creates a lot of meaningful jobs."

BluEarth, which runs a portfolio of hydro, solar and wind projects in British
Columbia, Alberta, Ontario and Nova Scotia, has created 35 new jobs in the past
four years. That's a small contribution but one that is being duplicated by
hundreds of other firms across the clean-tech sector.

Clean-power generation is also not a slave to commodity prices and the
subsequent boom and bust cycle that regularly hits the oil and gas sector, said
Mr. Brown, who initially worked in the oil patch but developed a "deep
dissatisfaction" with the lack of sustainability of the petroleum sector.
While Alberta will remain a key oil player, it can also be a "true leader"
renewables, he said.

The Clean Energy Canada report notes that much of the investment for Canada's
clean-tech expansion currently comes outside the country. Of the five largest
investors since 2009, just one, Manulife Financial Corp., is Canadian. Two
Japanese companies are in that top-five list, along with two German banking groups.

"The fact that foreign investors are coming to Canada to invest in our clean
energy, tells us that we have a fantastic resource," Ms. Smith said. "We need
Bay Street to wake up and recognize this is where the puck is going."
Alan Baker
2014-12-04 04:30:49 UTC
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Post by (ಠ_ಠ)
December 2, 2014 - http://www.theglobeandmail.com/
Green energy sector jobs surpass total oil sands employment
Climate think tank says Ottawa is 'really missing in action' when it
comes to support for clean energy
And a "climate think tank" wouldn't have any bias, right?

"We work to accelerate Canada’s transition to a clean and renewable
energy system. We build awareness of and support for solutions that
address climate disruption and foster an energy efficient,
environmentally responsible, and prosperous economy. We do so in
collaboration with civil society, governments, and the private sector."

Please not that there is no mention of whether such a transition is
rational or not...
Post by (ಠ_ಠ)
Canada's green energy sector has grown so quickly and has become such
an important part of the economy that it now employs more people than
the oil sands.
About $25-billion has been invested in Canada's clean-energy sector in
the past five years, and employment is up 37 per cent, according to a
new report from climate think tank Clean Energy Canada to be released
Tuesday. That means the 23,700 people who work in green energy
organizations outnumber the 22,340 whose work relates to the oil sands,
the report says.
Worldwide, 6.5 million people are employed in the clean-energy sector.
"Clean energy has moved from being a small niche or boutique industry
to really big business in Canada," said Merran Smith, director of Clean
Energy Canada. The investment it has gleaned since 2009 is roughly the
same as has been pumped into agriculture, fishing and forestry
combined, she said. The industry will continue to show huge growth
potential, beyond most other business sectors, she added.
While investment has boomed, the energy-generating capacity of wind,
solar, run-of-river hydro and biomass plants has expanded by 93 per
cent since 2009, the report says.
Clean Energy Canada says the industry's growth has been accelerated by
supportive policies in a handful of provinces. However, despite its
increased importance to the national economy, clean energy is still not
a priority in Ottawa, it says.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Government backing is crucial for this industry, Ms. Smith said, as it
has been for our other strategic industries. "Every major industrial
sector in Canada – from the aerospace industry to the oil sands –
has gotten off the ground with support from the federal government.
But in the clean-energy sector, the federal government is really
missing in action."
Not only does the oil industry still get more substantial subsidies,
she said, it also eats up a good deal of the country's diplomatic
relations efforts – through the lobbying for the
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Keystone XL pipeline, for example.
The report acknowledges that Ottawa has set some groundwork for clean
energy, by supporting clean-energy demonstration and research projects,
cutting energy waste and discouraging the construction of conventional
coal-power plants. But it says the federal government needs to do a
lot more. Ottawa should create tax supports for renewable technologies,
pump infrastructure money into new electrical transmission lines and
clean-energy projects, and put a price on carbon, it says.
As for the provinces, Alberta and Saskatchewan in particular should
follow Ontario, Quebec and British Columbia in getting into the
renewable-energy game, Ms. Smith said. Still, the necessity for this
shift is beginning to gain some traction, she said, noting that Alberta
Finance Minister Robin Campbell said last week that the province has to
"get off the oil train."
That's a view shared by Kent Brown, chief executive officer of BluEarth
Renewables Inc., a company that focuses on clean energy from the heart
of the oil patch in Calgary. This new sector is now "a huge piece of
the economy," Mr. Brown said. "It creates a lot of meaningful jobs."
BluEarth, which runs a portfolio of hydro, solar and wind projects in
British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario and Nova Scotia, has created 35 new
jobs in the past four years. That's a small contribution but one that
is being duplicated by hundreds of other firms across the clean-tech
sector.
Clean-power generation is also not a slave to commodity prices and the
subsequent boom and bust cycle that regularly hits the oil and gas
sector, said Mr. Brown, who initially worked in the oil patch but
developed a "deep dissatisfaction" with the lack of sustainability of
the petroleum sector. While Alberta will remain a key oil player, it
can also be a "true leader" renewables, he said.
The Clean Energy Canada report notes that much of the investment for
Canada's clean-tech expansion currently comes outside the country. Of
the five largest investors since 2009, just one, Manulife Financial
Corp., is Canadian. Two Japanese companies are in that top-five list,
along with two German banking groups.
"The fact that foreign investors are coming to Canada to invest in our
clean energy, tells us that we have a fantastic resource," Ms. Smith
said. "We need Bay Street to wake up and recognize this is where the
puck is going."
cloud dreamer
2014-12-04 13:32:46 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Alan Baker
Post by (ಠ_ಠ)
December 2, 2014 - http://www.theglobeandmail.com/
Green energy sector jobs surpass total oil sands employment
Climate think tank says Ottawa is 'really missing in action' when it
comes to support for clean energy
And a "climate think tank" wouldn't have any bias, right?
"We work to accelerate Canada’s transition to a clean and renewable
energy system. We build awareness of and support for solutions that
address climate disruption and foster an energy efficient,
environmentally responsible, and prosperous economy. We do so in
collaboration with civil society, governments, and the private sector."
Please not that there is no mention of whether such a transition is
rational or not...
Why wouldn't it be rational???

Climate Change aside, transitioning to renewable clean energy is
absolutely necessary. As much as you may want it, oil and coal is a
limited resource. There is only so much in the ground.

Now, tell me, which would you prefer.....that we transition to alternate
energies now while the supply of oil can satisfy the current need so
that when oil production starts to decline and cannot satisfy
demand...we have alternate energies to replace it.

Or would you prefer we 'drill, baby, drill' and burn, burn, burn without
thought for the future...until the point that the supply of oil starts
to decrease and can't satisfy our demand...and there's no ready made
alternate.

Now, I know it's hard, but think about it. We are not talking about a
time a hundred years in the future when the last drop of oil is
gone...we are talking about a time in the very near future when the
demand starts outstripping the demand.

How do you think the US, Russia, India and China are going to handle
that? How are they going to respond when they don't have enough oil to
keep their economies going, to keep their citizens warm?

Do you think they're going to shrug and say....gee, so nice that Canada
and Saudi Arabia still has all that oil.....must be nice to be Canadian
or Saudi...lucky buggers?

Sorry. No. They're going to say 'stand aside, we're coming in.'

I know climate deniers like to be single minded about things...."oil
good. Renewables bad, grunt, grunt, grunt"....but the simple fact of the
matter that even if we weren't pouring billions of tonnes of GHG into
the atmosphere, the transition is absolutely necessary...if not urgent.


And the think tank doesn't have bias. It has facts to support its
assertions.


..
(?_?)
2014-12-04 20:55:44 UTC
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Raw Message
cloud dreamer wrote...
Post by cloud dreamer
Post by Alan Baker
And a "climate think tank" wouldn't have any bias, right?
"We work to accelerate Canada?s transition to a clean and renewable
energy system. We build awareness of and support for solutions that
address climate disruption and foster an energy efficient,
environmentally responsible, and prosperous economy. We do so in
collaboration with civil society, governments, and the private sector."
Please not that there is no mention of whether such a transition is
rational or not...
[snip]
Post by cloud dreamer
I know climate deniers like to be single minded about things...."oil
good. Renewables bad, grunt, grunt, grunt"....
How many people are there on the planet that deny climate? One, two
maybe?
Hahahahahahaha !! Not been reading your bum buddy's postings on
alt.global-warming, Schild?
Sure you have . . . . and you even commented on how he went days non-stop
denying climate change.

Chom Noamsky / Kim Dobranski is just one of many rightwing idiots. YOU are
another one.
That's two right there . . . .

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